Podengo Central

Podengo Central

A place for Podengo owners and fanciers to share information and research the breed in a topical manner. Supported by the APPMGC & APPPC


    Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

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    Join date : 2009-08-08

    Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

    Post  Admin on Sun Aug 09, 2009 10:18 am

    Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCP) is a disorder of hip joint conformation occurring in both humans and dogs. In dogs, it is most often seen in the miniature and toy breeds between the ages of 4 months to a year.

    As in several other small breeds, a few individual Portuguese Podengo Pequenos have been affected by Legg Calve Perthes disease. LCP can also be caused by INJURY in otherwise normal animals. Although these issues are being addressed by PP breeders, so few PPs are affected in the USA and very little data has been accumulated from breeders world-wide, therefore very little detail is currently available.


    X-rays will help determine the correct diagnosis. As changes to bone occur slowly, X-rays taken early in the course of the disease may appear normal. Repeating the X-rays in 3 to 4 weeks will reveal the bony changes. A dog affected with LPD suffers a loss of blood supply to an area of the femur (thigh bone) known as the neck. Because the bone loses its blood supply, it dies. As a result of the loss of bone tissue, the neck of the femur collapses. The neck attaches the head of the femur to the body of the femur. When the neck collapses, the head of the femur is moved, and may also become deformed.
    These changes are readily apparent in X-rays. The head of the femur is the "ball" which sits in the "socket" on the pelvis, making up the hip joint. Therefore, changes to the head result in disruption of function of the hip joint which causes the pain and lameness.
    The term "avascular necrosis" means death of tissue due to lack of blood supply. In most dogs, only one hip is affected, and males and females are equally affected. Why this loss of blood supply to the area occurs is not known. What is known however, is the genetic nature of the condition. The exact mode of inheritance of LPD has been debated among researchers.
    Treatment of LPD usually consists of surgery to remove the damaged femoral head and neck (femoral head ostectomy). Mildly affected animals may recover soundness with only cage rest. Affected animals will probably always have some gait abnormalities, but make satisfactory pets after recovering from surgery.
    LCP is believed to be an inherited disease, although the mode of inheritance is not known.


    Last edited by Admin on Sun Aug 09, 2009 7:29 pm; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : update)

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